Language and Societies

ANT/LIN 5320 at Wayne State University

Examining the Use of Language in Promoting Hindu Patriarchy by Using Vedic Texts

Examining the Use of Language in Promoting Hindu Patriarchy by Using Vedic Texts

Natasha Modi

Patriarchy has become a common ideal attributed to Hinduism. Hinduism is based around the Vedas. The Vedas are known as the ancient Hindu scriptures. These holy scriptures are known as Vedic texts. They are meant to be the documentation of the guidance and wisdom provided by the Hindu gods and goddess. For the purposes of this paper the Vedic texts discussed are the Hindu epics. The Ramayana is a Hindu epic that was written by Valmiki around 500 BC. These Vedic texts were originally written in Vedic Sanskrit. Sanskrit can be traced back to Proto-Indo-Iranian and Proto-Indo-European. Much of the Vedic text is used by Hindu priests to perform rituals and prayers. Along with the priests, gurus and swamis interpret Vedic texts and preach their interpretations of the texts to their followers. Gurus and swamis are teachers of the Hindu religion. They are educated in Vedic texts from an early age and are believed to be the most knowledgeable. This paper will attempt to answer how does the language used in Vedic texts promote Hindu patriarchy? By examining the language used in Vedic texts relating to women and gender roles. Along with comparing and contrasting how gurus are not relying on Vedic texts while perpetuating patriarchy. While also examining literature written by other authors to demonstrate how patriarchy is promoted by using Hindu scriptures. Concluding, it will show how patriarchy is perpetuated in the Hindu community by using Vedic texts.

 

 

Advertisements

April 11, 2016 - Posted by | abstract

1 Comment »

  1. This sounds very interesting. I am not that well educated with Hinduism, and I never knew that the concept of patriarchy was so strong in the Vedic Texts. Is patriarchy still as strong in current teachings and in the Hindu community.

    Comment by Kristy Estabalaya | April 25, 2016 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: